More than Reckless Teenagers: In Defense of Romeo & Juliet’s Love

By Caitlin Smith Thousands of high school students in English classrooms across the world read, under-analyze, and hate Romeo & Juliet each year. Why is what’s arguably become Shakespeare’s most recognizable tragedy met with such vitriol from students? Can they not relate to the teenage angst exhibited by the titular characters? Is the language too…

Read More

Is Female Villainy All That Bad? Or, the Disappointing Heroines of the Fairy Tales Grimm

Written by Carolina Eleni Theodoropoulos Looking for heroines in the fairy tales Grimm can get very discouraging. Those few women who do have agency still fail—to my contemporary standards, at least—to qualify as heroines. Women in these stories do not ask for what they want (they probably don’t even know what they want as they …

Read More

Tracking Witches from the Forest to the Home: Bewitched and the Fairy Tales Grimm

Written by Carolina Eleni Theodoropoulos The realm of magic was always governed by women. Women are nymphs, they are jealous goddesses; they are lustful and vengeful monsters like Medusa, and dangerous women yielding destructive power like Pandora. In fairy tales they are witches, they are crones, they are evil stepmothers and hags. The norm in…

Read More

Nathaniel Hawthorne Doesn’t Want You To Be A Perfectionist, But You Probably Are And That’s Okay

Written by Caitlin Smith Nathaniel Hawthorne’s “The Birth-Mark” is an 1843 short story that primarily deals with issues of perfection and self image. With today’s perfection-seeking culture, where we tailor our lives to fit societal expectations on apps like Instagram, Snapchat, or Twitter, this story is especially relevant. It follows Aylmer, a scientist dabbling in…

Read More