Sensitivity Reading Reinforces and Encourages a More Diverse and Aware Publishing Process

Written by Kiran Gokal With the growing awareness of diversity in books, and more importantly, accurate representations, the need for sensitivity readers has grown substantially. A sensitivity reader is pretty much exactly what you hear: they are readers who read to minimize sensitivity. The practice is done on a manuscript to eradicate any internalized bias,…

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The Importance of Generating Compassion as a Fiction Writer: Karen Shepard at the Texas Book Festival

Written by Carolina Eleni Theodoropoulos A couple of weekends ago at the Texas Book Festival, Karen Shepard presented her new collection, Kiss Me Someone, while in conversation with Karen Russell, author of Swamplandia! Shepard spoke heavily about the responsibility she feels as a writer to cultivate compassion for characters that sometimes appear monstrous.

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Emily Wilson: First Woman to Translate the Odyssey into English

Written by Angie Carrera As a contemporary reader, when one hears the word “complicated,” it is natural to assume that someone is speaking of their newly changed relationship status, because everything in the twenty-first century is deemed “complicated.” British classicist Emily Wilson wrestled with this word and took into great consideration its social nuances and…

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Fanny Fern’s Obscurity and Male Dominance in Literary Circles

Fanny Fern wrote as if the Devil was in her—or so spoke Nathaniel Hawthorne. Born 1811 as Sarah Willis, Fanny Fern was the first female newspaper columnist in the United States, and by 1855, the highest-paid columnist of the 19th century. However, while her contemporaries Thoreau, Whitman, and Emerson are considered household names, Fern’s name is almost shrouded in obscurity. Why?

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Kazuo Ishiguro, the Nobel Prize, and Some Advice About Ploughing On

Photo by Matt Karr, Getty Images Written by Delia Davis  On Thursday, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature to Japanese-born British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro. “In novels of great emotional force,” wrote the academy, Ishiguro “has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” Ishiguro’s oeuvre includes novels, screenplays, short stories, and even…

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