Amazon, Third Party Sellers, and the Evil Empire

Written by Annie Diamond Amazon continues to be the worst with their policies surrounding third-party sellers and “buy” buttons. Amazon, which started out as a bookseller, has continued its practice of allowing third-party sellers to take equal prominence with first-party sellers under Amazon’s “buy book” option.

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How Neil Gaiman’s The Sandman Representation Continues to Impact and Inspire

Written by Jeff Rose Discussions on the importance of LGBTQ+ representation and accurate media portrayals and novel adaptations continue to dominate much of literary culture today. Neil Gaiman and N. K. Jemisin recently talked about these issues in a  discussion posted on LitHub. As someone who read Gaiman’s The Sandman as a teenager, it was…

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Brontë Society to Publish Two Lost Charlotte Brontë Manuscripts

Written by Kendall Talbot I thought I had experienced everything there was to experience regarding the Brontës: I have read all their published work, studied their lives in a class dedicated solely to them, and even made a literary pilgrimage to their home in Haworth (yes, the moors are as bleak and melancholy as Emily…

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Top Posts of March 2018

We’ve had plenty of great posts this March, from a rundown of the portrayal of witches through pop culture, to a manifesto on finally reading those books you keep telling yourself you’ll get to one day. Here’s a few of our favorites this month:

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On the Merit of Literary Awards

Written by Madalyn Campbell LitHub recently published an article detailing award-winning books that have been generally forgotten in time. Scrolling down the list, even the most avid reader may find themselves facing completely unheard-of books. These books earned highest honors, yet they have been swept up in the tidal wave of history. How much merit…

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Shakespeare and the Problem with Proto-Feminism

Written Emily Ogden Earlier this month, one of our contributing general staff members, Eleni Theodoropoulos, wrote an inaugural post for our “The Female Odyssey” column, about women and magic in fairy tales. Today, Emily Ogden contributes to that column as she talks about women in Shakespeare. If you are a fan of A Midsummer Night’s…

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Historical Fiction: Do Writers Owe Accuracy to Their Readers?

Written by Grace Mappes Whenever I think of historical fiction, a memory first comes to mind: I was raving to my then-boyfriend about the way Dan Brown manipulated and speculated upon the relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene in The Da Vinci Code, fictionalizing a sexual element that made perfect sense plot-wise to my then-teenage…

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