Translating Borges’ First Facebook Post

Written by JoJo Phillips Today, I am sitting on a stool in a long, grey hallway, looking at the portraits on the walls. The one in front of me is of a sad, old man named Borges. He is on the wall, like a fish, and looks down at me, also Borges. All around us,…

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Beyond That Which We Reap: A Look at Literary Responses to Nature

Written by Sydney Stewart One glance at any reputable news source, and the grim reality of climate change and environmental destruction is clear: the earth changes day after day largely as a result of human actions, and soon the environment won’t be hospitable, or even recognizable. Obviously, this is a problem. Massive amounts of literature acknowledges the beauty…

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Rewriting Witches: Evaluating the Renditions of Circe and Sabrina

Written by Anna Dolliver The Halloween witching season has come but not gone because apparently it is here to stay. According to this Ploughshares article: “The era of vampires and werewolves and brooding male anti-heroes on the screen and on the page seemed to be over, with female-centric stories of witchcraft emerging as a powerful symbol…

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The Misapplied Female Villainy in Emma Cline’s The Girls

Written by Kylie Warkentin As any young, voracious reader can attest, I used the worlds novels offered as benchmarks in which to measure the unruliness of the world around me. As a teenage girl trying her hardest to scrape together any sort of sense of self, books seemed like they held, if not the answers,…

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Halloween Staff Picks: Favorite Incantations

As it happens another Halloween is upon us, and as it happens, it coincides with Hothouse‘s website launch for the 2018-19 academic year. To celebrate, as an act of inauguration, we thought we’d do something collaborative, something that will stir up the spirits and press them to set a watchful eye over our site. Just…

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More than Reckless Teenagers: In Defense of Romeo & Juliet’s Love

By Caitlin Smith Thousands of high school students in English classrooms across the world read, under-analyze, and hate Romeo & Juliet each year. Why is what’s arguably become Shakespeare’s most recognizable tragedy met with such vitriol from students? Can they not relate to the teenage angst exhibited by the titular characters? Is the language too…

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Interview with John Morán Gonzáles

Written by Guadalupe Rodriguez Texas land is huge—with approximately 28 million people, the faces of Texas are colorful, and filled with different experiences. From rich stories of black and Latino people, to the stories of Native Americans, UT’s English Department attempts to account for some of the faces of Texas and beyond. One colorful face…

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