The Importance of Generating Compassion as a Fiction Writer: Karen Shepard at the Texas Book Festival

Written by Carolina Eleni Theodoropoulos A couple of weekends ago at the Texas Book Festival, Karen Shepard presented her new collection, Kiss Me Someone, while in conversation with Karen Russell, author of Swamplandia! Shepard spoke heavily about the responsibility she feels as a writer to cultivate compassion for characters that sometimes appear monstrous.

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Emily Wilson: First Woman to Translate the Odyssey into English

Written by Angie Carrera As a contemporary reader, when one hears the word “complicated,” it is natural to assume that someone is speaking of their newly changed relationship status, because everything in the twenty-first century is deemed “complicated.” British classicist Emily Wilson wrestled with this word and took into great consideration its social nuances and…

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The Era of Pop Poetry

Written by Brandi Carnes Rupi Kaur’s latest release, The Sun and Her Flowers, is only the second book in the young writer’s career, but it’s already among the most popular works on the shelves. Kaur’s explosive career, along with similar writers such as Atticus and Lang Leav, are at the forefront of a literary revolution.…

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The Bones of Stesichorus

Written by Julia Schoos “What difference did Stesichorus make?” asks Anne Carson in the beginning of Autobiography of Red (3). For years, Geryon’s story lived in the mouth of the people focusing solely on Herakles and his journey, with Geryon merely an hurdle to be overcome during his labors. First and foremost a creation of…

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Fanny Fern’s Obscurity and Male Dominance in Literary Circles

Fanny Fern wrote as if the Devil was in her—or so spoke Nathaniel Hawthorne. Born 1811 as Sarah Willis, Fanny Fern was the first female newspaper columnist in the United States, and by 1855, the highest-paid columnist of the 19th century. However, while her contemporaries Thoreau, Whitman, and Emerson are considered household names, Fern’s name is almost shrouded in obscurity. Why?

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Kazuo Ishiguro, the Nobel Prize, and Some Advice About Ploughing On

Written by Delia Davis  On Thursday, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature to Japanese-born British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro. “In novels of great emotional force,” wrote the academy, Ishiguro “has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” Ishiguro’s oeuvre includes novels, screenplays, short stories, and even lyrics. Some of his more prominent…

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Celebrating Native American History through Literature

Many Native American artists commemorate their history and heritage through the creation of beautiful paintings, tapestries, pottery, woven baskets, jewelry, literature and many other forms of art. Today, the Hothouse staff celebrates the following Native American writers and their works. N. Scott Momaday Pulitzer Prize winner N. Scott Momaday’s Again the Far Morning is a combination…

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