Fanny Fern’s Obscurity and Male Dominance in Literary Circles

Fanny Fern wrote as if the Devil was in her—or so spoke Nathaniel Hawthorne. Born 1811 as Sarah Willis, Fanny Fern was the first female newspaper columnist in the United States, and by 1855, the highest-paid columnist of the 19th century. However, while her contemporaries Thoreau, Whitman, and Emerson are considered household names, Fern’s name is almost shrouded in obscurity. Why?

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Kazuo Ishiguro, the Nobel Prize, and Some Advice About Ploughing On

Photo by Matt Karr, Getty Images Written by Delia Davis  On Thursday, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Literature to Japanese-born British novelist Kazuo Ishiguro. “In novels of great emotional force,” wrote the academy, Ishiguro “has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.” Ishiguro’s oeuvre includes novels, screenplays, short stories, and even…

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Celebrating Native American History through Literature

Many Native American artists commemorate their history and heritage through the creation of beautiful paintings, tapestries, pottery, woven baskets, jewelry, literature and many other forms of art. Today, the Hothouse staff celebrates the following Native American writers and their works. N. Scott Momaday Pulitzer Prize winner N. Scott Momaday’s Again the Far Morning is a combination…

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